About your Search

20100101
20100131
STATION
CSPAN 21
FOXNEWS 14
CNN 13
CSPAN2 8
MSNBC 6
WHUT (Howard University Television) 6
WMPT (PBS) 5
WETA 4
HLN 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 80
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)
and money to peace with the taliban undermine the environment with the afghan people? homage karzai has been defending himself from the accusation. -- homage karzai. britain's prime minister answered questions from afghan and british students and defended his deployment of british troops. our world from paris -- our world affairs correspondent was there. >> president karzai arrives in london knowing he has repair work to do on his own reputation and that of his government. last ye's afghan elections were widely seen as flawed by widespread corruption. at the same time, more troops than ever were being killed or injured in the war against the taliban. was it, one student asked, worth the price being paid? >> british soldiers have been fighting in afghanistan for nine years. practically half my life. have we seen any change in the situation over there? will we get better? or will my children ask me the same question? >> i think the first thing to say is we had to take action in 2001. after the al-qaeda bombing of new york, the knowledge that al- qaeda were operating from afghanistan, the help
and money to the taliban not undermine the freedoms won by the afghan people? tommy karzai has been defending himself against accusations ahead of thursday's london conference on afghanistan. britain's prime minister gordon brown answered questions from afghan and british students and defended his deployment of british troops. our world affairs correspondent was there. >> president karzai arrives in london knowing that he has repair work to do on his reputation and that of his government. last year's afghan elections were widely seen as flawed by widespread corruption. at the same time, more western troops than ever were killed or injured in the war against the taliban. was it worth the price, one student asked? >>. is it shoulders have been fighting in afghanistan at nine years, -- british soldiers have been fighting in afghanistan nine years, practically have my life. will it get any better or will my children be asking me the same questions? >> i think the first thing to say it is we had to take action in 2001 after the bombing of new york, the knowledge that al qaeda was operati
nominees. president karzai says the president's decision was bad news, but will be respected. >> it was a long and disappointing way 400 karzai. -- disappointing for karzai. his 17 rejected included a controversial former warlord who fought against the taliban. president carter signed wanted him to continue as energy minister. -- president karzai what did him to continue. he pledged to place more women in government posts in a male- dominated society. the nominations for justice, commerce, and communication also failed. among the successful reappointment or the interior minister and defense minister, but no one has been nominated to fill the post of foreign minister. it will not be decided until a conference on afghanistan takes place this month. the president said he will make some nominations but it is uncertain who he will announce. parliament has spoken and the president said he will respect its decision. the western allies will make it clear they want to tackle corruption and threaten to withhold funding from any ministry run by a corrupt politician. >> rescue operations
the environment wi the afghaneople? homage kzai has been defending himself from the accusation. -- homage karzai. britain's prime minister swered questions from afghan d british studts and defended his deoyment of british troops. our world om paris our wod affairs correspondent was there. >>president karzai arrives londonnowing he has repair ork to do on hiswn reputation and that of his vernment. last year's afghan elections were widelyseen as flawed by widespread corruption. at the same time, mo troops than ever were being killeor injured in the war against the taliban. was it, one studt asked, worth e price being paid? british soiers have been fighting in afghanistan for nine years. practically ha my life. ha we en any cnge in the situation over ere? will we get better? or will my children ask me the same question? >> i tnk the first thing to say i we had to takection in 2001. after the al-qaeda bombing of new york, the knowledge tt al- qaeda were opering from afghanistan, the hp that was given them by the taliban govement. the question is how can we keep our streets safe and how good the res
for afghanistan's president karzai. the parliament rejected most of karzai's picks to fill his new 24-member cabinet. most turned down were viewed as cronies of karzai. a bit of controversy from five years ago is flaring up again this weekend in denmark where a man has been arrested for trying to kill an artist who drew cartoons of the prophet mohamm mohammed. sheila macvicar has more. >> reporter: carried into the courthouse on a stretcher his face covered to conceal his identity, this is the man police say tried to murder danish cartoonist kurt westergaard. the somali broke into westergaard's home last night wielding an axe and a knife and shouting he wanted to kill him. the car to bist and his five-year-old granddaughter was able to take shelter in a specially secured bathroom. when the police arrived two minutes later, the would-be killer attacked them, too. police shot him in the knee to stop him. five years another a danish newspaper commissioned a dozen cartoons depicting the prophet mohammed. kurt westergaard drewab image of the prophet with his turbin shaped as a bomb. the publicati
in the afghan parliament was a stinging rebuke to president hamid karzai, rejecting 17 of his 24 cabinet nominees. the prize move caused new disarray. two months after karzai was declared winner of a presidential election plagued by fraud. today karzai ordered parliament to cancel its winter break so it vote on a new list of nominees that he's now preparing. he's under pressure to show progress in governing by january 28 when an international conference on the afghan mission convenes in london. among the rejected nominees was influential word lord khan and the only woman karzai had named. lawmakers criticized many on the list as unqualified political cronies. several holdovers in vital posts were approved. among them the defense minister and the minister of interior. along with the ministers of finance, education, and agriculture. i spoke to afghan ambassador today and asked him how big a setback this was to karzai. >> it may be a temporary setback for the president but it's a step forward for the democracy in afghanistan. it's really happy for the parliament of afghanistan to do their j
cabinet nominees. the prize move csed new disarray. two months aer karzai was clared winner of a presential election plagued byraud. today karzai ordered parliament to cancel its winter bak so it ve on a new list of nomine that he's now preparing. 's under pressure to show progress igoverning by january 28 wn an inrnational conference on the afghan missi convenes in lond. among the rejected nominees was inuential word lord khan and e only woman karzai had named. lawmers criticized many on the list as unqualied litical cronies. sevel holdovers in vital posts were approd. among th the defense minister and the minisr of interior. along with the ministe of finance, educati, and agriculture. i spoke to afghan ambassor today and asked him how bia setbk this was to karzai. >> imay be a temporary setback for e president but it's a step forwd for the democracy in afgnistan. it's really happy fothe parliament of afghistan to do theirob the way they are supposedo be doing. >> warner: that seems like strange reacti. a tback for the president but you think it's a good thing? >> we are bu
karzai and his leadership to address this. >> what's your sense of that? have you seen any change in president's karzai steps? >> he's looking to ministers. he and i actually talked about this. his strategic intent is there. what struck me in meeting with these elders was the evolution of this corruption. so, it wasn't something that was always there. it's been over the last decade or so that they spoke to it. these same elders said to me that they were embarrassed that the united states soldier, sailors, airmen, marines were dying for them. they want to lead this effort. they appreciate what we've done, but they really want to lead this effort and this is something i know the president, president karzai is trying to engender in his leadership with his people. >> but what you talk about the leadership issue. you talked in the past about interviews about the critical need of good, local leadership. president karzai, by many accounts, is not moving forward in his second term. you know, his appointments to the cabinet were largely rejected by parliament and many on grounds that these
others have spoken to the need for president karzai and his leadership to address this. >> what's your sense of that? have you seen any change in president karzai's footsteps? >> initially -- he was -- looking to ministers and he and i actually talked about this in his strategic intent is there. what struck me in meeting with these elders was the evolution of this corruption. so it wasn't something that was always there. it has been over the last decade or so that they spoke to it. these same elders said to me that they were embarrassed, that the united states soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines were dieing and they want to lead this effort. they appreciate what we have done but they really want to lead this effort and this is something i know the president, president karzai, is trying to engender in his leadership with his people. >> you talk about the leadership issue and talked in the past and in interviews about the critical need of good local leadership. president karzai, by many accounts, is not moving forward in his second term. the -- his appointments to the cabinet were largely
to have -- that's part of the equation, and we have to have the karzai government show us that we -- it is going to truly reform. >> let's start with the karzai government, senator mccain. while you are there, president karzai is trying another time to get his cabinet approved. if he does not have faith that these people are not corrupt, if we can't get to that simple first step, how can we build institutions or repair roads and put them to work and educate them in afghanistan and build the confidence that trust the central government and not the taliban? >> they have a long way to go in the area of corruption. but the fact the parliament rejected his nominees, i think you can see a democratic process moving forward. president karzai recognizes what he just has been through was an important lesson to him. we have to keep pressing on the corruption issue. let me tell you two other things that concern me. first of all, i think we have the right strategy and the right resources and the right leadership. we went outside kandahar to an operating base where americans and afghan soldiers
to have the karzai government show us that we, that it is going to truly reform. >> well, let's start with the karzai government. senator mccain, while you were there, president karzai is trying another time to get his cabinet approved. if he cannot even get a cabinet approved and he does not have the faith of other people in their government that they're not corrupt. if we can't get to that simple first step, how can we build institutions and how can we repair roads and put people to work and educate them in afghanistan and build the confidence of the afghan people that trust your central government, not the taliban? >> well, they have a long way to go in the area of corruption, but the fact that the parliament rejected his nominees, i think you can look at a democratic process moving forward. i believe that president karzai recognizes that what he's just been through was an important lesson to him. we have to keep pressing on the corruption issue. but let me tell you two other things that concern me, first of all, i think we have the right strategy and the right resources and the ri
problem, and we have to have -- that's part of the equation, and we have to have the karzai government show us that we -- it is going to truly reform. >> let's start with the karzai government, senator mccain. while you are there, president karzai is trying another time to get his cabinet approved. if he cannot even get a cabinet approved, he does not have the faith of other people in his government that these people aren't corrupt, they know how to do the basics of good governance. if we can't get to that simple first step, how want we build institutions and build roads, put people to work and build confidence in the afghan people, trust your central government, not the taliban? >> they have a long way to go in the area of corruption. but the fact the parliament rejected his nominees, i think you could look at a democratic process moving forward. i believe president karzai recognizes that what he's just been through was an important lesson to him. we have to keep pressing on the corruption issue. let me tell you two other things that concern me. first of all, i think we have the right
government as well. guest: years ago when he met with hamid karzai at a dinner, someone said to him, mr. president, how are you going to address this problem of corruption? in fact, he said, what problem? joe biden, famously -- dinner was over -- he threw his napkin down and said, this dinner is over, and walked out. nothing has happened to defrost his relations with president karzai. both biden and richard holbrooke have terrible relations with karzai. host: james traub is with us to talk about the influence of joe biden. republicans, 202-737-0001. democrats, 202-737-0002. independents, 202-628-0205. you can send us an e-mail or tweet us at. next phone call. caller: i think our president is doing very well. if we wanted joe biden as president, he would be president. i like the idea that our president is intelligent. he is not a puppet, like the last eight years. i think he is doing what he is supposed to be doing. host: james traub? guest: i guess i would agree, in general. he believes he could be a good president. i believe this is almost a desirable alternative. he is a very knowledg
't have to continue. khzaei -- karzai was a great hope. everyone no knows him respected him. he might change his mind. the pressures that led him to permit and maybe support this corrupt structure could be reversed over time. the people up and down that structure might change their mind. the parliament is -- has stood up against his nominations. who's knows who's going to happen up and down that road. if we succeed in something that we can do, peter has pointed out the crucial important to the kandahar road. than doesn't be impossible to secure that. that changes the economic nature of southern afghanistan. it could get better. >> if i could just add one point. there's no question that the ghost of vietnam haunts this administration. i can tell you from being in it for 60 days. the ghost of what happened to lyndon johnson walks the corridors of this white house, it walks the corridors of this building every day. it's a mistake. we got to get over it. we got to stop fighting the vietnam war. i don't know whether we could have won or not, but it is not relevant to afghanistan. as marc p
. the book centers on this incident which i described where u.s. special operators blocked hamid karzai's planned governor for kabul. she interweaves into it a very well-written and interestingly a history that is well-written, well-organized, and based on a lot of her own research with the original sources. a second really important understanding of the country can be gotten from joe haversty's book "the opium season" which details a year in which he was involved in as a subcontractor in the usaid efforts in 2 004-2005 to provide alternative livelihood's to draw with the work force from up opium production. it gives a great view of the violence and corruption. and moreover it shows the bureaucratic profiteering and dysfunction that is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war, but in development. a third source, and i think it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is rory stewart, who within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked to kabul in the winter which is supposed to kill you and through pashtun villages and described that experienc
. karzai -- having legitimacy, and i do not think we have that. this will depend on achieving security, which i think is achievable, and with good government comes with our own money invested in jobs. without jobs, afghanistan will not be a positive scenario in the future, but i must conclude by pointing out that this is not going to affect our domestic national security, as we see with the last three plots. the underwear bomber came from nine cheerio region with -- came from nigeria. one of them came from somalia, and major hassan came from washington, d.c. thank you very much. [applause] >> peter has to leave at 11:00, so he should take the first few questions, and there is a microphone in the back of the room for anyone who would like to ask a question. >> i work 30 years of the journalists. i retired two years ago. my question is for peter. what i hear now is exactly what i was hearing before the iraq war, and the promise was saddam hussein was on popular. then we will have a democracy. now it is an islamic system. there is a hypothesis that afghan people love us. the last point i
about the cabinet picks, the selections of hamid karzai. cabinet crisis reveals karzai's weakening grasp. lawmakers unhappy with the president's pick. what is the concern over the choices? >> guest: president karzai has made two sets of choices. he nominated once slate of cabinet officials about 24 of them. seventeen were rejected by the parliament. the parliament in a healthy move is asserting itself. this is a good thing. have some balancing, checks and balances as we understand them. so the parliament looked at the first slate of nominees from karzai and did not like many of them. rejected them. the parliament did choose, did agree, and did confirm several of the most important cabinet choices from president karzai, minister of defence and minister of interior which handles all the police, minister of finance, minister of agriculture. one of the big recipients of assistance. so the cabinet in this area somewhat. president karzai has recently submitted a second slate to replace those that were rejected the first time. these are lesser-known people. the second slate of lesser-known peop
stated to be beginning about 18 months after to give karzai and his regime enough time to stand up and fight for itself. we will see. host: we have our numbers on the screen and we will get to the calls in immelman. -- in a moment. you laid out a number of issues which have to be practical issues that have to be dealt with, but the fact of the matter is that you bring vietnam and it becomes a political issue as well. tell us how you view this as a political issue. guest: the lesson that we need to learn, i think, from john kennedy's experience is this. he was with -- he was withdrawing at the time. we have the classified documents. but he did not tell the truth to the american people why? for political reasons. he wanted to get it reelected in 1964. he had begun to order the withdrawal in 1963. host: and these would have been the trainer said you talked about. guest: 16,000 of visors, not combat troops. but my point is that obama should not repeat that experience. he is clearly going to do the best that we can in a given amount of time, but what we face the prospect -- if we face t
analysts and commanders with the information they need. meantime, afghan president hamid karzai is expected to present a new list of cabinet nominees to parliament saturday. lawmakers last week rejected most of karzai's picks. and the family of the jordanian doctor who killed eight people on a c.i.a. base in afghanistan last week says he wanted to die in a holy war. abulawi had been recruited by jordanian intelligence to help the u.s. effort against al-qaeda. we have another account of stimulus money going to places that don't exist. and up next, what about the promises of transparency in healthcare reform talks? needs ts tomorrow morning. we should send them overnight with fedex. i already sent them. i didn't use fedex. better cross your fingers. [ man ] oh, yeah, the accident. well, you better knock on wood. remember, we did a green renovation in here, there's no wood. but russ bought a rabbit's foot. 's a bear claw. you could throw salt over your shoulder. actually, that's a salt substitute. but you should find dan -- i think he's a leprechaun. what is it about me that says leprechaun? c
of afghanistan, there is a big political setback for president hamid karzai. parliament rejected 70% of his choices for a new cabinet, including the only woman nominated. karzai's choices were seen as a first test of his quest to build a legitimate and accountable government. many of the nominees were criticized for having been picked for reasons other than their competency. >>> back in our nation's capital here, the senate republican leader strikes an optimistic note. mitch mcconnell saying he understands why show thors might be weary of the political infighting in the nation's capital, but says disagreements are indispensable to a healthy democracy. while the u.s. faces major challenges here, the minority leader predicts better days ahead. >> two long and difficult wars, a prolonged recession, double-digit unemployment, difficult days for our nation. in this new year, we are grateful for the courageous men and women of our own day who keep a lonely watch to defend the cause of liberty. we are also painfully aware of how many americans were out of work this christmas, but these challenges
karzai and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably with the trip that hillary clinton and i had made to afghanistan on october 18 and 19 in conjunction with the inauguration. the afghans understood this, they are very comfortable with it. so i need to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it@@@@@@p it's a common problem i've seen in every war i've been involved in. let's not confuse the number of cell phones with low the war is going. let's not minimize that cell phone penetration is a hugely important
gear as losing its cachet and they point to the fact that president karzai began wearing this hat as an attempt to devise the war broke the was afghan rather than fm or regional but there is a quote in here from an afghani saying now it is clear mr. karzai is a passion. do you have confidence in the government, do you have concerns? >> guest: i have confidence and concerns just as i did in iraq. we have to understand the huge challenges the leaders in both of these countries face literally just in staying alive. i got to know hamid karzai when i first got to afghanistan at the beginning of 2002 when he had only been in office a few weeks himself. eight years later he's still in office facing extraordinarily challenges. and there are clearly a lot of problems and things he has to work on and things we have to do in support of him but i had the opportunity to get to know him personally and whatever hat he may be wearing at the moment one thing i absolutely persuaded is he is an afghan national list. >> host: next on call river hit new york on the republican line. >> caller: ambassad
, thereby taking the initial i.e.c. count to 54.-- 54 point something percent and having president karzai accept that, which i think was a good step for afghanistan. of course the runoff never happened but at least the e.c.c. was able to maintain its independence and show that the rule of law does matter to some degree in afghanistan. so with that, let me briefly introduce our three distinguished speakers and turn it over to them to speak just for a few minutes, probably no more than 10 minutes each if you can keep it to that, so we can have a frank and vibrant discussion and q&a session after that. to my far left, scott warden who just returned to the institute here. he's a senior rule advisor with usit, who was on a leave of absence to work as one of the three international members of the electoral complaints commission. he was also involved in the elections in 2005 for parliament when he was with the jdmb. you have their buy yows in front of you, i won't go into too much detail on that. isabel root is desk officer for the e.a.d. at the department of political affairs at the united nati
. >>> the afghan parliament has overwhelmingly rejected the new cabinet of president hamid karzai. 17 of 24 nominations were rejected by afghan lawmakers. the vote is a serious setback for karzai, coming on the heels of his controversial re-election as president. >>> somehow, some way, a suicide bomber managed to slip onto a u.s. base in afghanistan without being searched, killing seven cia officers. now a terror group is taking credit for wednesday's attack, praising a possible double agent. cnn's atea bowie is in kabul with the very latest. >> reporter: the question that remains is just how a suicide bomber was able to make it onto an american base in eastern afghanistan, detonate his vest and kill seven cia agents. american officials here in afghanistan still are not talking about just how he was able to do that. the taliban claiming that he was actually an afghan soldier, a soldier that they were able to convince to switch allegiances rather than fighting with the u.s. forces, fighting against the u.s. forces. and the taliban claimed that they will continue to infiltrate the afghan army
the delegation. we rallied the world behind the administration's new strategy. since then, karzai has been re-elected, a messy election, but it's done. president obama's announced the 30,000 troops you just referred to. and it's a very good time to bring the world back together to reaffirm its support and to move to the next stage, because we're now -- 2010 is going to be a year of heavy implementation. >> is about getting money from these -- >> no, this is not a pledging conference. enough of those for the time being. countries are coming through, the japanese have just quadrupled their aid. we're going to increase our assistance in many ways, but this is about policy. >> now, let's go to afghanistan's attempts to try to get the taliban, at least not the leaders of the taliban, but sort of the rank and file of the taliban reintegrated in some form in the government. is this possible -- we see that every attempt, it feels like one step forward, three steps back at this point. >> let's not confuse two things. reintegration and reconciliation. i know these are complicated words, but reconciliat
with taliban fighters. president hamid karzai said he wants to let militants lay down their weapons and go home, so long as they are not affiliated with al qaeda. karzai spoke in istanbul, turkey, three days before an international conference on afghanistan in london. he said gathering international support was key. >> in the past, this effort by the afghan government did not have the backing or the support of our international partners. this current effort, this renewed effort, i should say, has the backing of our partners, in particular the united states and europe. >> sreenivasan: at the same time, the nato commander in afghanistan said he hopes an influx of troops will force taliban leaders to accept peace. general stanley mcchrystal suggested former taliban could even join the government. he said, "i think any afghans can play a role if they focus on the future, and not the past." also today, nato officials announced two more soldiers-- one british, one norwegian-- have been killed in bombings in afghanistan. the u.s. military will speed up a review of more than 4,300 iraq and afghanistan
described where u.s. special operators blocked karzai's planned governor for kabul but she interweaves into it a very well written and interestingly -- history that is well written and well organized and -- and based on a lett of her own research with the original sources, a second reading -- rell important understanding of the country can be gotten from joel's book the opium season. and that details a year in which he was involved in a -- as a -- subcontractor in u.s. a.i.d. efforts in 2004 and 2005 to provide alternative livelihoods, to -- to draw away the work force from opium production. and it gives a great view of the violence and corruption and this complex tribal and world relations. and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic prove fit tiering and dysfunction that -- is -- is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war but in -- in development. a third source and it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is roshy stewart, wo within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked from iraq to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you. an
an interim government in afganistan to be led by its interim president hamid karzai. despite the early success al qaeda's leadership was able to find a safe haven in pakistan's tribal areas. a few years later it gained enough strength to once again pose a serious threat to the u.s. meanwhile the taliban reestablished its headquarters in pakistan and gained enough strength as a result of inadequate afghanistan security forces. by last year the situation had grown so pa perilous that generl stanley mcchrystal issued a report stating that our failure to gain the initiative and reverse the momentum of the taliban within 12 months to make defeating the insurgency impossible. it was largely as a result of that assessment that the president agreed last year to send 30,000 more troops to afganistan. earlier this month i and some of my colleagues had the opportunity to visit afganistan and pakistan to assess the situation on the ground firsthand. among other things, we saw progress in the crucial southern provinces of kandahar. though in the early phases general crystal's -- mcchrystal's plan t
. they are the first combat casualties in afghanistan this year. afghan president hamid karzai has ordered parliament to postpone the winter recess until he announces a new list of cabinet nominees. last week, lawmakers rejected 17 of his 24 selections. well, some history was made last month in iraq. correspondent molly henneberg reports on a side of progress in the almost 7-year-old conflict. >> reporter: no u.s. troops died in combat operations in iraq in the month of december, military leaders say. the first month without combat fatality since the war started in 2003. >> that is a fairly significant milestone for us as we continue to move forward. i think it also speaks to the level of violence and how it's decreased over time. >> reporter: overall, combat deaths have been on the decline since may 2007 when 120 u.s. service men and women were killed. the second highest per month total since the beginning of the war. within a month, all of the additional 30,000 troops ordered by president bush to surge into iraq had arrived. the following april there were 40 combat deaths, the highest in 2008. 13 c
on afghanistan, the london conference will be attended by president karzai the u.n. secretary general vana and 60 nations will be represented. we will be announcing new figures for nato forces and for afghan forces in the time to come. and we will be focusing on how the political and civilian surge that we plan in afghanistan can match and complement the military service that is taking place. on wednesday, the day before the first international meeting will be held to agree how we can strengthen support for yemen in its efforts against al qaeda and how we can help the government of yemen with the development and governance. as i said last week in a common statement i made on security, we know that there are terrorist groups with plans to hinchliffe damage on our country and we are always on alert. we will be vigilant against those who seek to destroy and undermine our democracy and our way of life. let me add one thing also at this morning. i sent my condolences to president harari and prime minister mellis after the crash of the ethiopian airways flight on the coast of lebanon and we are working
runoff, thereby taking the initial iec countdown to 50% and having president karzai accept that. which i think was a good step for afghanistan. of course, the runoff never happened when the opponent pulled out, but they were able to maintain that the rule of law does matter to some degree in afghanistan. let me just briefly introduce our three distinguished speakers and turn it over to them to speak just for a few minutes, probably no more than 10 minutes each if you can keep it to that so that we can have a frank and vibrant discussion in q&a after that. to my far left is scott ward iw who was on a leave of absence last year to work as one of the three international members of the electoral complaints commission. scott was also involved in the elections in 2005 for parliament when he was with the jemb. you have their bios in front of you, so i will not go into too much detail. isabel has also worked in afghanistan back in 2005 as a political adviser. she knows quite a bit about afghanistan's elections and has been following the process is very closely. finally to my left, grant kippen,
nominees for president karzai's cabinet. one of them was the only female nominee. what does this say about the is stability of afghanistan? >> reporter: it could say two things right now. it could say one, that the afghan government were not obviously happy with president karzai's choices. many parliamentarians have said he basically chose people who helped him during the campaign that he made promises to so he could get the presidency again. another way of looking at this, it's democracy in action. here you have the parliament who are turning down president karzai's choices. we should mention two weeks earlier when i asked the president at a press conference why he didn't have more female choices, he had only had one in his list, he conceded that he knew the parliament would reject a lot of his choices and he told me he expects to have more and more females within this cabinet and women throughout the government. >> brooke. >> an tillal, thank you. >>> we will take an inside look at what is being called the world's newest, tallest building. first though, our random moment in 90 seconds. >
to attack this plane head today america. >> afghanistan's parliament delivering a stinging blow to karzai, voting down 17-24. karzai said he will make new nominations, it's unclear when. in another high stakes political issue the chief of afghanistan as election commission says a parliamentary vote will be held in may despite widespread international concerns. north carolina is going smoke free. effective today the leading tobacco producing state is banning in restaurants and bars and relative late comers in the tobacco ban. becoming 29th ban in restaurants and 24th for bars. any smoker or establishment that refuses to obey the law will face stiff fines. that's are the latest stories, back to you. >> shannon: thank you, caroline. national association of is your ban hospitals are calling on members of to rethink regulations, especially cutting medicare payments. molly henneberg takes a look how tt affect hospitals treating low income patients. >> at howard university hospital in washington d.c., also a level one trauma center, about 20% of patients walk in the door uninsured. although many
levin just returned from afghanistan. >> another thing to watch is whether or not president karzai and we can come up with a program for reintegration of those lower level taliban which will chip away at the power at the taliban and help support the efforts of the afghan security forces. >> reporter: u.s. commanders acknowledge the need to bring at least some lower level taliban leaders into the political and social fabric of afghanistan. general stanley mcchrystal, the top military commander, when asked if the taliban could play a role in the future of afghanistan said, i think any afghans can play a role if they focus on the future and not the past. but reality remains harsh. u.s. troops continue their push into helmand province in the south. the next target? the marjah area, yet another taliban strong hold. and in north waziristan, bad new pz p the pakistani military has told the u.s. it's delayed further combat operations here. that will give unsurge ents more time to consolidate and possibly launch new attacks into afghanistan. u.s. military intelligence calculates the taliban
the number of civilians and increase the civilian component capability of the karzai government. >> one official says, quote, the attack will be a venged, unquote, but it was the most deadly attack against the cia since the war began, and one said it was the deadliest attack on the embassy since 1993 which killed two agents. >>> two boys who had been missing for 11 years have been found safe, and the mother taken into custody is accused of kidnapping them. this is the picture taken back in 1998. the mother was arrested yesterday in pennsylvania. the boys are now 15 and 17. local authorities say they found them after a social worker became suspicious because of things that they said about their past. the father, i just can't get over it. >> i was listening to a voice message when i turned white as a ghost, is about what i was told. i know i was shaking, too, a little bit. my girlfriend calmed me down. >> the mother says she's a victim of domestic violence and her sons are victims of sexual abuse. police say there is no merit to her claims. her ex-husband says he hopes she spends some tim
they are ready to sign up and support car sky. -- karzai. there is a distinction between the foot soldier and the leaders who gave a safe hache to osama bin laden and al qaeda from which they launched attacks on this country on 9/11. so he sees the distinction. i don't think it should be lost on you. i think we can look at think with some subtlety between these two. and go after the foot soldiers and try to win them over. and ultimately figure out what to do with the hierarchy as we go up the ladder. now, omar is probably the extreme, the foot soldiers are the other extreme. question is what happens to the others? can they be won over? can they become a part of the political fabric that gates spoke of? and that's i think what we are all trying to figure out. i don't know that we have an answer yet. >> at what point does the 30,000 new troops, the department set up to begin accepting converts, from the taliban, reconciliation sectors, like south america. >> it's not an issue for the department. this is an issue for the government of afghanistan. clearly just reading president karzai's comm
on this monday morning, fox news alert. afghanistan's president karzai says security has been restored there after one of the biggest attacks in the capital city of kabul. take a look at this new video out of afghanistan where fighting between taliban militants and afghan forces have left at least five people dead. dozens more injured. a taliban spokesman says that 20 armed militants stormed the capital city targeting several government buildings. reports say several people were killed after separate homicide attack outside a kabul shopping center. that man right there who breached security at jfk airport causing the terminal to be evacuated said he did it by mistake. he says he got lost while trying to leave the airport to find a taxi. he was returning to new york from haiti where he fled the earthquake. the security breach delayed dozens of flights and travelers waited hours to be rescreened. he's now free on bail right now. of course, martin luther king jr. day today. a day when we remember the civil rights leader's "i have a dream" speech. >> yes, we're passing through a hard wint
. that's the same message we saw and heard in afghanistan with hamid karzai. these reluctant leaders that we, the united states, need. >> that's exactly right, tamron. we'll find the focus shifting from afghanistan to other potential sanctuaries, and in all of these cases we're dealing with teetering or failed states, weak governments, imperfect allies. but we have to work with them and find a way to partner with these imperfect friends and find a way to root out al qaeda within their countries, be much more aggressive with intelligence operations, because we're not going to be able to apply military forces to these places. >> i want to take that point directly to jim at the pentagon. jim, on that point as far as yemen, how much does our military, does our government, how much can we trust the yemeni government? >> there's not a whole lot of trust of the the ability of the yemen government, you know, they do feel at this point that the yemen government is sincere in trying to take down, or at least diminish the effectiveness of al qaeda in yemen itself. it's also dealing with a civil
by afghan president hamid karzai is viewed as one of the most corrupt in the world and building the capacity for a functioning government and build up police and military so they can over the course of the next 18 to 24 months take control, take responsibility for the security situation here. julie. >> julie: connor powell, thank you. closer to home now, mexico announcing the capture of an alleged drug lord from a notoriously violent gang south of the bore they are. carlos dell tran l. vechlt a, carrying two guns and ammo and a false driver's license. he was nabbed on wednesday and waiting to disclose his arrest. his older and powerful brother was killed in a shootout with mexican troops. arturo beltran was the reputed treat of the beltran leva cartel. his taking down one of the highest in the mexican government's fight against drug gangs. a plane slides off a runway in germany, and collides in turkey, as we go around the world in 80 seconds. turkey, a passenger train crashing head-on into another train. the collision in northwestern turkey killing one of the engine drivers and injuring at
as a combination of president musharraf and hamid karzai. he's a man who rules with an iron fist. his forces are killing his own people. he does not tolerate religious minorities. on the other side, he has an incredibly corrupt administration. so in some ways, he embodies the worst of both pakistan and afghanistan's leaders. >> what do you make of our sending back people over there for rehabilitation? i mean, one of the handlers of the attacker on christmas day was apparently sent back with the theory that he had been rehabilitated through art training. >> yes, he had been sent to saudi arabia, and saudi arabia has a rehabilitation program that gets quite high marks from people from independent observers, people in this country who have taken a close look at it. there's always going to be a few people who fall through, a few people who escape, if you like, the system. it's clear some of these people are turning up. saudi arabia, keep in mind, has been cracking down on al qaeda and its own borders, and a lot of those people have been fleeing across the borders to yemen. so the situation in ye
with afghan president hamid karzai, on the eve of an international conference on afghanistan in london. in afghanistan, 11 suspected taliban militants were killed in an air and ground strike by nato and afghan forces. former honduran president manuel zelaya went back into exile today-- this time, in the dominican republic. the leftist leader was ousted in a coup last june, but he returned to honduras in september and holed up in the brazilian embassy. his departure today came hours after the new honduran president -- porfirio lobo-- was sworn into office. authorities in peru today worked to rescue hundreds of tourists stranded at machu picchu. the ruins of the incan citadel are world renowned. at least five people have been killed after five days of heavy rain triggered mudslides and widespread flooding across the area, in the andes mountains. . in all, some 2000 people were trapped, including 400 americans. u.s. officials deployed helicopters to help with evacuations. those are some of the day's main stories. i'll be back at the end of the program with a preview of what you'll find t
while karzai had to survive while he was being neglected, he is a pashtun. however, he is a peaceful one. his father was a parliamentarian. he himself is not pocketing money, or whatever. host: we're going to let it go there and let john newman reply. guest: i know we are short on time. it is crucial and my son talked to me about all the time how important it is, and the soldiers know that, to treat the local population while group a lot of their medics were training kids from the -- were treating kids from the village who were being hurt by the mortars from the taliban who could not shoot them very well. and we are expanding considerably the civilian effort t. host: how does that compare with vietnam? guest: we suffered in the early years of the war for not having paid attention to that. host: jon newman teaches courses in soviet, chinese, and east asian history. this is his book. you can try to track and online. thanks for being with us this morning. that will about do it for washed -- for "washington journal" this morning. we will be back at 7:00 a.m. eastern tomorro
led by afghan president hamid karzai, which is widely seen as one of the most corrupt governments in the world. also to build up the afghan security forces so that the government and police and army are capable of taking over control of afghanistan in the next 18 to 24 months. but in many ways, jamie, it's the second part of the mcchrystal strategy, ability of the afghan government and security forces that will be the most difficult part of the plan here in afghanistan, jamie. >> jamie: connor powell, live for us in kabul. connor, stay safe. thanks. >> eric: some are asking this morning is it time to lock the door at gitmo? with yemen clearly an al-qaeda hotbed, should the bam ball administra obama administration adjust plans for gitmo? the 200 detainees are from yemen and some have returned to yemen and authorities say one is al-qaeda's number two there. so with the troubles in the country right now, is this really the best time for them to be sent home? joining us now is cullly simpson, legal fellow at the heritage foundation and former deputy assistant secretary for defense for
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)